Light vanity, insatiate cormorant,
Consuming means, soon preys upon itself

Cormorano

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July 5, 2014 at 8:37pm
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Dottor Catricalà, mi permetta una domanda da falso nomade: “Se tutti facciamo il consigliere di stato, chi paga le tasse per pagare i consiglieri di stato?”. La Fifa con i diritti tv del Mondiale. Dopo pochi minuti la Fifa smentisce. Per cui è vero.

— Innamorato fisso del 5 luglio 2014

June 30, 2014 at 12:00pm
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Democracy

Democracy

10:00am
2 notes

In realtà, chiunque abbia conosciuto innamorati – e capita a tutti – e si ricorda di se medesimo amoroso o amorosa, sa benissimo che chi è trafitto d’amore è un personaggio monotono, ripetitivo, dalla aggettivazione scialba e iterativa, affranto dal gravame dei luoghi comuni, emotivamente instabile, solipsista, convinto che l’oggetto del suo amore sia di interesse generale, e più stupito che irritato se nota una certa tendenza a cambiare discorso nei più cari e pazienti sodali. L’innamorato è socialmente una peste, un diluvio innocente, un farneticante, un ossessivo, e sebbene tutto ciò sia assai nobile e fondamentale del punto di vista della storia psicologica specifica, non è credibile che costui sia in grado di produrre testi letterari interessanti.

— Giorgio Manganelli

June 28, 2014 at 1:17pm
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Hayek on Keynes’s Ignorance of Economics (1978)

1:09pm
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Milton and Rose Friedman →

An uncommon couple

June 14, 2014 at 10:00am
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Law

Law

June 13, 2014 at 6:00pm
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Love and Death

Father: Remember that nice boy next door, Raskolnikov?
Boris: Yeah.
Father: He killed two ladies.
Boris: What a nasty story.
Father: Bobik told it to me. He heard it from one of the Karamazov brothers.
Boris: He must have been possessed.
Father: Well, he was a raw youth.
Boris: Raw youth, he was an idiot!
Father: He acted insulted and injured.
Boris: I heard he was a gambler.
Father: You know, he could be your double!
Boris: Really, how novel!

4:00pm
2 notes
Manhattan in 1944, by Andreas Feininger

Manhattan in 1944, by Andreas Feininger

June 10, 2014 at 2:00pm
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Spesso ho la sensazione di barare. Perché i miei strumenti intellettuali, le mie parole coprono un’infelicità, un dolore, un fallimento. Ho barato in politica perché dopotutto non me ne fregava più di tanto; ho barato in famiglia, come può fare un marito inadatto; ho barato all’università non riuscendo a dare ciò che avrei potuto, o nascondendo i miei limiti. Solo come infermo mi pare di avere agito senza trucchi.

— Luca Canali

May 6, 2014 at 12:00pm
48 notes
reblogged from book-du-jour
Salon Kitty

Salon Kitty

10:39am
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At this time [January 1, 532] an insurrection broke out unexpectedly in Byzantium among the populace, and, contrary to expectation, it proved to be a very serious affair, and ended in great harm to the people and to the senate, as the following account will show. In every city the population has been divided for a long time past into the Blue and the Green factions; but within comparatively recent times it has come about that, for the sake of these names and the seats which the rival factions occupy in watching the games, they spend their money and abandon their bodies to the most cruel tortures, and even do not think it unworthy to die a most shameful death. And they fight against their opponents knowing not for what end they imperil themselves, but knowing well that, even if they overcome their enemy the fight, the conclusion of the matter for them will be to be carried off straight away to the prison, and finally, after suffering extreme torture, to be destroyed. So there grows up in them against their fellow men a hostility which has no cause, and at no time does it cease or disappear, for it gives place neither to the ties of marriage nor of relationship nor of friendship, and the case is the same even though those who differ with respect to these colours be brothers or any other kin. I, for my part, am unable to call this anything except a disease of the soul.

— Procopius, History of the Wars

May 5, 2014 at 2:00pm
192 notes
reblogged from derrierelasalledebains
William Burroughs’ desk at the “Beat Hotel” in Paris, 1970

William Burroughs’ desk at the “Beat Hotel” in Paris, 1970

12:00pm
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The Economic Way of Looking at Life →

Gary Becker’s Nobel Prize Lecture (1992)

May 2, 2014 at 10:00am
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Manhattan

Manhattan

May 1, 2014 at 9:03pm
167 notes
reblogged from theparisreview

With many of my films—almost all—if I’d been able to get on screen what I conceived, they would have been much better pictures. Fortunately, the public doesn’t know about how great the picture played in my head was, so I get away with it.

— Woody Allen [via theparisreview]